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Dk Hanna Afiqah bte Pg Hassanal Ali Saifuddien, who is an A Level student at Maktab Sains PSBS, will be attending the Global Changemakers 7th Global Youth Summit from 25 November to 1 December 2012 in High Wycombe, England. The Global Youth Summit will bring together 60 young social entrepreneurs, community activists and volunteers aged [...]

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Dk Hanna Afiqah bte Pg Hassanal Ali Saifuddien, who is an A Level student at Maktab Sains PSBS, will be attending the Global Changemakers 7th Global Youth Summit from 25 November to 1 December 2012 in High Wycombe, England. The Global Youth Summit will bring together 60 young social entrepreneurs, community activists and volunteers aged 16 to 21 from around the world to exchange best practices and developing action plans for projects that tackle issues ranging from AIDS/HIV and corruption to education and human rights.

Dk Hanna was honoured to be given the opportunity to be a part of the Global Changemakers network and attend the Global Youth Summit. She said, “I’m looking forward to networking with inspiring global changemakers from all over the world when we gather at the Global Youth Summit and to exchange ideas that if cultivated can potentially help societal issues and help our own local communities back home.”

During the summit, participants will work in issues-based groups (e.g. environment and climate change, social entrepreneurship, education, human rights) to develop plans for joint and individual projects aimed at addressing these issues and raising awareness about them. In addition, the participants brought into the network at the Global Youth Summit become eligible to apply for individual grant funding and support. They will also join existing workgroups collecting knowledge, ideas and best practices and share their ideas and experience with the wider Global Changemakers community.

British Deputy High Commissioner to Brunei, Sunny Ahmed said, “I am delighted that Dk Hannah will be joining the Global Changemakers Youth Summit in the UK (supported by the British Council). She is clearly a very bright and motivated young lady (selected from amongst thousands of applicants), committed to bringing about positive change. It is fitting that Dk Hanna will be embarking upon a journey of personal development just days after His Majesty outlined the Development of Youth as a priority area during Brunei’s chairmanship of ASEAN. We look forward to working with Dk Hanna upon her return and believe she will be an inspiration to other young people in Brunei and around the world.”

Dk Hanna was selected from over 3400 applicants from all over the world to join the Global Changemakers network. The Global Changemakers programme is a group of young people between the ages 16 and 25 who have demonstrated a track record of achievement in their local communities through social entrepreneurship, social activism and voluntary work. They are part of a global network where they share ideas and best practices, and participate in high-level political and economic events to act as advocates for the youth.

There are currently over 800 Changemakers, more than 200,000 young people involved in Global Changemakers activities each year, and 3.2 million beneficiaries of GCM projects. Since its inception in 2007, Global Changemakers has organised and run over 15 regional and global youth workshops across the world – in Amman, Beirut, Brussels, Cape Town, Doha, Harare, Rio de Janeiro and London, among others. Global Changemakers have been invited to participate in World Economic Forum events, the Clinton Global Initiative, G20, UN World Climate Conference, Women Deliver, and the launch of the World Bank’s Youth Anti-Corruption network, among others.

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Dk Hanna Afiqah bte Pg Hassanal Ali Saifuddien, who is an A Level student at Maktab Sains PSBS, will be attending the Global Changemakers 7th Global Youth Summit from 25 November to 1 December 2012 in High Wycombe, England. The Global Youth Summit will bring together 60 young social entrepreneurs, community activists and volunteers aged 16 to 21 from around the world to exchange best practices and developing action plans for projects that tackle issues ranging from AIDS/HIV and corruption to education and human rights.

Dk Hanna was honoured to be given the opportunity to be a part of the Global Changemakers network and attend the Global Youth Summit. She said, “I’m looking forward to networking with inspiring global changemakers from all over the world when we gather at the Global Youth Summit and to exchange ideas that if cultivated can potentially help societal issues and help our own local communities back home.”

During the summit, participants will work in issues-based groups (e.g. environment and climate change, social entrepreneurship, education, human rights) to develop plans for joint and individual projects aimed at addressing these issues and raising awareness about them. In addition, the participants brought into the network at the Global Youth Summit become eligible to apply for individual grant funding and support. They will also join existing workgroups collecting knowledge, ideas and best practices and share their ideas and experience with the wider Global Changemakers community.

British Deputy High Commissioner to Brunei, Sunny Ahmed said, “I am delighted that Dk Hannah will be joining the Global Changemakers Youth Summit in the UK (supported by the British Council). She is clearly a very bright and motivated young lady (selected from amongst thousands of applicants), committed to bringing about positive change. It is fitting that Dk Hanna will be embarking upon a journey of personal development just days after His Majesty outlined the Development of Youth as a priority area during Brunei’s chairmanship of ASEAN. We look forward to working with Dk Hanna upon her return and believe she will be an inspiration to other young people in Brunei and around the world.”

Dk Hanna was selected from over 3400 applicants from all over the world to join the Global Changemakers network. The Global Changemakers programme is a group of young people between the ages 16 and 25 who have demonstrated a track record of achievement in their local communities through social entrepreneurship, social activism and voluntary work. They are part of a global network where they share ideas and best practices, and participate in high-level political and economic events to act as advocates for the youth.

There are currently over 800 Changemakers, more than 200,000 young people involved in Global Changemakers activities each year, and 3.2 million beneficiaries of GCM projects. Since its inception in 2007, Global Changemakers has organised and run over 15 regional and global youth workshops across the world – in Amman, Beirut, Brussels, Cape Town, Doha, Harare, Rio de Janeiro and London, among others. Global Changemakers have been invited to participate in World Economic Forum events, the Clinton Global Initiative, G20, UN World Climate Conference, Women Deliver, and the launch of the World Bank’s Youth Anti-Corruption network, among others.

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Chevening So Far…

This article appeared in the Brunei Times today. Here’s the “director’s cut” if you will heheh ;) I’d like to express my thanks to all at FCO, BHC and British Council for all the help and support thus far! It has been over a year but it feels like just yesterday that I applied for [...]

This article appeared in the Brunei Times today. Here’s the “director’s cut” if you will heheh 😉 I’d like to express my thanks to all at FCO, BHC and British Council for all the help and support thus far!

It has been over a year but it feels like just yesterday that I applied for the Chevening Scholarship using the online application form. The thing I remember most vividly was writing the personal statement. This is what I wrote:

“As a new media & communications professional with a sociology background, I am immensely interested in the way new media and the internet have shaped profound changes in society. The way we interact with one another, be it at home, at work, or at a wider, global level, has changed with the advent of the internet and the web 2.0, and currently, the web 3.0 phenomenon. The changes are brought about at a speed unheard of before this time. Never before has an understanding of the internet and new media been more important.

In Brunei Darussalam, there is a current shortage of people with new media experience especially from a government perspective. The broadcasting portfolio, which includes new media, has recently been taken on by the Ministry of Communications, and although there may be plenty of experience in the traditional broadcasting space, I believe there is a dire need for help in the new media component of this portfolio.

By undergoing this MA course, I hope to be able to track and study these changes from a Bruneian perspective and help my country’s government and relevant agencies foresee what the trends will bring about and prepare ourselves more adequately for whatever changes these trends may bring about, particularly the negative ones. I intend to set up an Advisory Council on the Impact of New Media on Society to advise the government accordingly.

In looking for a suitable course, I was drawn to University of Leicester‘s MA in New Media and Society, particularly because of the title, which seemed very focused on my area of interest.”

Here’s what it says in the prospectus: “The MA New Media and Society course is a one-year full time taught course. It aims to provide students with a critical knowledge of the historical development and key paradigm shifts in the study of media, culture and communication and with a comprehensive grounding in the theories and research necessary for studying, analysing, and understanding media and communication processes in both national and global contexts. The course provides extensive training in communication research, methodology and theory.”

Fast forward to 20th September 2009, the last day of Ramadhan, after the final sungkai for Ramadhan this year, I was at the airport, bound for UK. To say this was a sad occasion is an understatement! Ushering in Aidil Fitri on a plane is something I have not done in a very long time.

At the airport

At the airport before departure 🙁

The 18 hour flight to London was an uneventful one broken only by a short equally uneventful stop in Dubai.

On arriving in London Heathrow, I was pleasantly surprised that there was a representative from the British Council waiting for me with a card bearing my name on it. He was there to make sure I collected my advance stipend from the right Travellex branch and to make sure I had transport to Leicester. After collecting the stipend, I then told the gentleman that I had a coach from the University waiting to take me to Leicester. I thanked him and bade him farewell.

There were over 140 other students arriving at Heathrow on that morning, all bound for Leicester! And the next 3 hours were spent waiting for all groups to arrive. During the wait, friendships were made and numbers exchanged.

4252340933_4b3d53cd46_o

My new friend Susanna from Germany enjoying a sandwich during the pitstop

[continue reading…]

This article appeared in the Brunei Times today. Here’s the “director’s cut” if you will heheh 😉 I’d like to express my thanks to all at FCO, BHC and British Council for all the help and support thus far!

It has been over a year but it feels like just yesterday that I applied for the Chevening Scholarship using the online application form. The thing I remember most vividly was writing the personal statement. This is what I wrote:

“As a new media & communications professional with a sociology background, I am immensely interested in the way new media and the internet have shaped profound changes in society. The way we interact with one another, be it at home, at work, or at a wider, global level, has changed with the advent of the internet and the web 2.0, and currently, the web 3.0 phenomenon. The changes are brought about at a speed unheard of before this time. Never before has an understanding of the internet and new media been more important.

In Brunei Darussalam, there is a current shortage of people with new media experience especially from a government perspective. The broadcasting portfolio, which includes new media, has recently been taken on by the Ministry of Communications, and although there may be plenty of experience in the traditional broadcasting space, I believe there is a dire need for help in the new media component of this portfolio.

By undergoing this MA course, I hope to be able to track and study these changes from a Bruneian perspective and help my country’s government and relevant agencies foresee what the trends will bring about and prepare ourselves more adequately for whatever changes these trends may bring about, particularly the negative ones. I intend to set up an Advisory Council on the Impact of New Media on Society to advise the government accordingly.

In looking for a suitable course, I was drawn to University of Leicester‘s MA in New Media and Society, particularly because of the title, which seemed very focused on my area of interest.”

Here’s what it says in the prospectus: “The MA New Media and Society course is a one-year full time taught course. It aims to provide students with a critical knowledge of the historical development and key paradigm shifts in the study of media, culture and communication and with a comprehensive grounding in the theories and research necessary for studying, analysing, and understanding media and communication processes in both national and global contexts. The course provides extensive training in communication research, methodology and theory.”

Fast forward to 20th September 2009, the last day of Ramadhan, after the final sungkai for Ramadhan this year, I was at the airport, bound for UK. To say this was a sad occasion is an understatement! Ushering in Aidil Fitri on a plane is something I have not done in a very long time.

At the airport

At the airport before departure 🙁

The 18 hour flight to London was an uneventful one broken only by a short equally uneventful stop in Dubai.

On arriving in London Heathrow, I was pleasantly surprised that there was a representative from the British Council waiting for me with a card bearing my name on it. He was there to make sure I collected my advance stipend from the right Travellex branch and to make sure I had transport to Leicester. After collecting the stipend, I then told the gentleman that I had a coach from the University waiting to take me to Leicester. I thanked him and bade him farewell.

There were over 140 other students arriving at Heathrow on that morning, all bound for Leicester! And the next 3 hours were spent waiting for all groups to arrive. During the wait, friendships were made and numbers exchanged.

4252340933_4b3d53cd46_o

My new friend Susanna from Germany enjoying a sandwich during the pitstop

(more…)

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