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It’s a word that reeks of New Age dogma – “Abundance”. To someone who lives in a world where bills have to be paid and money doesn’t appear out of the sky from meditation, “abundance” can just sound plain goofy. Abundance is a state of mind. It is not its literal meaning, “a very large [...]

It’s a word that reeks of New Age dogma – “Abundance”.

To someone who lives in a world where bills have to be paid and money doesn’t appear out of the sky from meditation, “abundance” can just sound plain goofy.

Abundance is a state of mind.

It is not its literal meaning, “a very large quantity of something,” or “the counting of many things.” When spiritual teachers refer to abundance, they mean that you want for nothing, and that you have everything you need right now.

Abundance pulls you into the present so that you recognize the true breadth of possibilities before you.

It’s hard for most of us to feel abundant though about our money because we’re sure we’ll never have enough of it. We’re not aware of our own financial neuroses. We accidentally live small financial lives. You want to live a big life filled with mission and purpose, but your thoughts on money stay small. You get stuck.

Abundance is your way out. Abundance allows you to mentally break from the habits you practice out of fear and insecurity about the future.

Abundance is for everyone. You may not believe it until you’ve come to terms with your own financial story, but you’re getting in your own way.

The Double A’s of Financial Struggle

The two main ways we sabotage our finances day in and day out – Avoidance and Attachment.

Which one do you practice?

Read more here

It’s a word that reeks of New Age dogma – “Abundance”.

To someone who lives in a world where bills have to be paid and money doesn’t appear out of the sky from meditation, “abundance” can just sound plain goofy.

Abundance is a state of mind.

It is not its literal meaning, “a very large quantity of something,” or “the counting of many things.” When spiritual teachers refer to abundance, they mean that you want for nothing, and that you have everything you need right now.

Abundance pulls you into the present so that you recognize the true breadth of possibilities before you.

It’s hard for most of us to feel abundant though about our money because we’re sure we’ll never have enough of it. We’re not aware of our own financial neuroses. We accidentally live small financial lives. You want to live a big life filled with mission and purpose, but your thoughts on money stay small. You get stuck.

Abundance is your way out. Abundance allows you to mentally break from the habits you practice out of fear and insecurity about the future.

Abundance is for everyone. You may not believe it until you’ve come to terms with your own financial story, but you’re getting in your own way.

The Double A’s of Financial Struggle

The two main ways we sabotage our finances day in and day out – Avoidance and Attachment.

Which one do you practice?

Read more here

Read the full article →

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At its core, the X-Pro2 is a rangefinder style camera (and one that actually works a little like a rangefinder, thanks to some clever digital technology) that should appeal not only to the traditional rangefinder crowd, but also to enthusiasts who may be more accustomed to other styles of camera as well. The X-Pro2 is technically [...]

At its core, the X-Pro2 is a rangefinder style camera (and one that actually works a little like a rangefinder, thanks to some clever digital technology) that should appeal not only to the traditional rangefinder crowd, but also to enthusiasts who may be more accustomed to other styles of camera as well.

The X-Pro2 is technically the successor to Fujifiilm’s original X-mount camera, the X-Pro1, however in the context of Fujifilm’s camera business it’s much than that. In many ways the X-Pro2 raises the bar for the entire Fujifilm line of interchangeable lens cameras, including the current top of the line X-T1. Headline features include a 24MP X-Trans sensor, a new hybrid AF system, and picture-in-picture viewfinder design borrowed from the X100, along with improved video quality.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.dpreview.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

At its core, the X-Pro2 is a rangefinder style camera (and one that actually works a little like a rangefinder, thanks to some clever digital technology) that should appeal not only to the traditional rangefinder crowd, but also to enthusiasts who may be more accustomed to other styles of camera as well.

The X-Pro2 is technically the successor to Fujifiilm’s original X-mount camera, the X-Pro1, however in the context of Fujifilm’s camera business it’s much than that. In many ways the X-Pro2 raises the bar for the entire Fujifilm line of interchangeable lens cameras, including the current top of the line X-T1. Headline features include a 24MP X-Trans sensor, a new hybrid AF system, and picture-in-picture viewfinder design borrowed from the X100, along with improved video quality.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.dpreview.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Read the full article →

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There’s no doubt that it’s never too soon to instil some entrepreneurial skills in your kids – so check out this infographic. Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.siliconrepublic.com See on Scoop.it – Aspiring Outliers

There’s no doubt that it’s never too soon to instil some entrepreneurial skills in your kids – so check out this infographic.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.siliconrepublic.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

There’s no doubt that it’s never too soon to instil some entrepreneurial skills in your kids – so check out this infographic.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.siliconrepublic.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Read the full article →

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Jamie and the Food Revolution team want to change the way people eat by educating every child about food, giving families the skills and knowledge to cook again, and motivating people to stand up for their rights to better food. Food Revolution Day aims to educate and inspire people everywhere to stand up for real [...]

Jamie and the Food Revolution team want to change the way people eat by educating every child about food, giving families the skills and knowledge to cook again, and motivating people to stand up for their rights to better food. Food Revolution Day aims to educate and inspire people everywhere to stand up for real food and empower the public to demand more from governments, schools and food manufactures all over the world in order to sanction the mission of better food, and improved food education for all. – See more at: http://visual.ly/bring-food-education-back#sthash.OXeiDuDR.dpuf

Bring Food Education Back

Jamie and the Food Revolution team want to change the way people eat by educating every child about food, giving families the skills and knowledge to cook again, and motivating people to stand up for their rights to better food. Food Revolution Day aims to educate and inspire people everywhere to stand up for real food and empower the public to demand more from governments, schools and food manufactures all over the world in order to sanction the mission of better food, and improved food education for all. – See more at: http://visual.ly/bring-food-education-back#sthash.OXeiDuDR.dpuf

Bring Food Education Back

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To really understand the difference between the two, we first need to define them. Merriam-Webster defines social media and social networking as the below: Social Media: forms of electronic communication (as Web sites for social networking and microblogging) through which users create online communities to share information, ideas, personal messages, and other content (as videos). Social [...]

To really understand the difference between the two, we first need to define them. Merriam-Webster defines social media and social networking as the below:

Social Media: forms of electronic communication (as Web sites for social networking and microblogging) through which users create online communities to share information, ideas, personal messages, and other content (as videos).

Social Networking: the creation and maintenance of personal and business relationships especially online

With that said, let’s take a look at the five biggest differences between social media and social networking.

Communication Style

On social media, you’re doing all of the talking. You’re publishing content—images, videos, eBooks, infographics, white papers, and more—and trying to generate engagement with your fans and followers, and ultimately hoping that they interact with your brand or take an action.

With social networking, there needs be a mix of both talking and listening. If you’re joining groups and networks on social media and doing all of the talking—posting about your brand and tooting your own horn—you’re not going to get the type of respect that you probably deserve, and you’re likely going to miss out on some great opportunities because you’re not listening.

To be great at social networking, you have to take the time to listen and engage with others.

Goals

Perhaps the biggest difference between social media and social networking is the goal that you’re trying to achieve.

With social networking, your ultimate goal is to build your network of fans/followers and foster those relationships. Whether or not those relationships lead to new business is an unknown, but it’s not the ultimate goal.

Social media differs because while you’re certainly trying to generate buzz and interaction, you also want to increase your bottom line, and that means data acquisition for lead generation and sales for eCommerce.

Content

Content is so important to every aspect of marketing, and while you need it for both social media and social networking, the type of content you use for each is going to be different.

In social networking, it’s a lot of rich conversation and questions. You’re having deep, informative conversations with people in hopes of sparking a connection and gaining a new fan or follower while growing your referral network.

On the social media side of things, you’re trying to drive engagement, and you can’t do that with 250 word Facebook posts. No, you need to be posting and sharing images, videos, infographics, and other meaningful pieces of content to keep your audience engaged and interested in your brand.

It’s not to say that this type of content can’t overlap, but how you use the content should be different.

Time & Effort

If you’re an active brand on social media, you’re probably using a tool like Hootsuite or Sprout Social to help save time and measure the analytics behind your efforts. You can create your posts and schedule them out days ahead, and then sit back and watch the engagement that takes place.

With social networking, there’s no automated way to really grow relationships, and you can’t cut corners. Each interaction you have needs unique focus and attention.

Social networking is like dating—it’s time consuming, and it takes a lot of time and effort to really make it work, but it’s all worth it in the end.

ROI Measurement

In this digital age, we’re all trying to measure the ROI from everything that we do, especially social media.

How you attribute ROI to your social media and social networking is going to differ because you need to go about the two completely different. Measuring the ROI from your social networking efforts is going to be easier because there’s more direct response—if your network of social followers is increasing, then that’s measurable ROI.

But since your social media strategy is about generating buzz and engagement, it’s a bit difficult to nail down that type of return. Over a longer period of time, you should be able to attribute some type of success, but it’s not going to be as clear as it is in your social networking game. Of course if you’re driving things like sales and you have your tracking and analytics in place, it’ll be easier to measure your ROI.

All in all, social media and social networking are two important marketing tactics, but they each come armed with their own unique challenges.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.socialmediatoday.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

To really understand the difference between the two, we first need to define them. Merriam-Webster defines social media and social networking as the below:

Social Media: forms of electronic communication (as Web sites for social networking and microblogging) through which users create online communities to share information, ideas, personal messages, and other content (as videos).

Social Networking: the creation and maintenance of personal and business relationships especially online

With that said, let’s take a look at the five biggest differences between social media and social networking.

Communication Style

On social media, you’re doing all of the talking. You’re publishing content—images, videos, eBooks, infographics, white papers, and more—and trying to generate engagement with your fans and followers, and ultimately hoping that they interact with your brand or take an action.

With social networking, there needs be a mix of both talking and listening. If you’re joining groups and networks on social media and doing all of the talking—posting about your brand and tooting your own horn—you’re not going to get the type of respect that you probably deserve, and you’re likely going to miss out on some great opportunities because you’re not listening.

To be great at social networking, you have to take the time to listen and engage with others.

Goals

Perhaps the biggest difference between social media and social networking is the goal that you’re trying to achieve.

With social networking, your ultimate goal is to build your network of fans/followers and foster those relationships. Whether or not those relationships lead to new business is an unknown, but it’s not the ultimate goal.

Social media differs because while you’re certainly trying to generate buzz and interaction, you also want to increase your bottom line, and that means data acquisition for lead generation and sales for eCommerce.

Content

Content is so important to every aspect of marketing, and while you need it for both social media and social networking, the type of content you use for each is going to be different.

In social networking, it’s a lot of rich conversation and questions. You’re having deep, informative conversations with people in hopes of sparking a connection and gaining a new fan or follower while growing your referral network.

On the social media side of things, you’re trying to drive engagement, and you can’t do that with 250 word Facebook posts. No, you need to be posting and sharing images, videos, infographics, and other meaningful pieces of content to keep your audience engaged and interested in your brand.

It’s not to say that this type of content can’t overlap, but how you use the content should be different.

Time & Effort

If you’re an active brand on social media, you’re probably using a tool like Hootsuite or Sprout Social to help save time and measure the analytics behind your efforts. You can create your posts and schedule them out days ahead, and then sit back and watch the engagement that takes place.

With social networking, there’s no automated way to really grow relationships, and you can’t cut corners. Each interaction you have needs unique focus and attention.

Social networking is like dating—it’s time consuming, and it takes a lot of time and effort to really make it work, but it’s all worth it in the end.

ROI Measurement

In this digital age, we’re all trying to measure the ROI from everything that we do, especially social media.

How you attribute ROI to your social media and social networking is going to differ because you need to go about the two completely different. Measuring the ROI from your social networking efforts is going to be easier because there’s more direct response—if your network of social followers is increasing, then that’s measurable ROI.

But since your social media strategy is about generating buzz and engagement, it’s a bit difficult to nail down that type of return. Over a longer period of time, you should be able to attribute some type of success, but it’s not going to be as clear as it is in your social networking game. Of course if you’re driving things like sales and you have your tracking and analytics in place, it’ll be easier to measure your ROI.

All in all, social media and social networking are two important marketing tactics, but they each come armed with their own unique challenges.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.socialmediatoday.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Read the full article →

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A sharing economy takes a variety of forms, often leveraging information technology to empower individuals, corporations, non-profits and government with information that enables distribution, sharing and reuse of excess capacity in goods and services. A common premise is that when information about goods is shared (typically via an online marketplace), the value of those goods [...]

A sharing economy takes a variety of forms, often leveraging information technology to empower individuals, corporations, non-profits and government with information that enables distribution, sharing and reuse of excess capacity in goods and services. A common premise is that when information about goods is shared (typically via an online marketplace), the value of those goods may increase, for the business, for individuals, and for the community.

Collaborative consumption as a phenomenon is a class of economic arrangements in which participants share access to products or services, rather than having individual ownership.

The collaborative consumption model is used in online marketplaces such as eBay as well as emerging sectors such as social lending, peer-to-peer accommodation, peer-to-peer travel experiences, peer-to-peer task assignments or travel advising, car sharing or commute-bus sharing.

More here.

collab-consumption-infographic

A sharing economy takes a variety of forms, often leveraging information technology to empower individuals, corporations, non-profits and government with information that enables distribution, sharing and reuse of excess capacity in goods and services. A common premise is that when information about goods is shared (typically via an online marketplace), the value of those goods may increase, for the business, for individuals, and for the community.

Collaborative consumption as a phenomenon is a class of economic arrangements in which participants share access to products or services, rather than having individual ownership.

The collaborative consumption model is used in online marketplaces such as eBay as well as emerging sectors such as social lending, peer-to-peer accommodation, peer-to-peer travel experiences, peer-to-peer task assignments or travel advising, car sharing or commute-bus sharing.

More here.

collab-consumption-infographic

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Have you ever wondered how Facebook is moderated? And with the global nature of Facebook, who are these moderators? The following infographic by Who Is Hosting This reveals the details about Facebook traffic, showing how Facebook moderators play a huge role in making sure that our newsfeeds are safe from offensive content. Other details include a look at the 800 [...]

Have you ever wondered how Facebook is moderated? And with the global nature of Facebook, who are these moderators?

The following infographic by Who Is Hosting This reveals the details about Facebook traffic, showing how Facebook moderators play a huge role in making sure that our newsfeeds are safe from offensive content.

Other details include a look at the 800 to 1,000 Facebook moderators worldwide, the types of content that are subject to moderation, as well as the reporting process that the flagged content goes through before any decision is made about it.

Source: designtaxi.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Have you ever wondered how Facebook is moderated? And with the global nature of Facebook, who are these moderators?

The following infographic by Who Is Hosting This reveals the details about Facebook traffic, showing how Facebook moderators play a huge role in making sure that our newsfeeds are safe from offensive content.

Other details include a look at the 800 to 1,000 Facebook moderators worldwide, the types of content that are subject to moderation, as well as the reporting process that the flagged content goes through before any decision is made about it.

Source: designtaxi.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Read the full article →

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See on Scoop.it – Aspiring Outliers The social media industry has revolutionized the online worlds, including the traditional methods to online marketing. Companies and businesses need to develop strategies of their own or they risk behind left in the dust by competitors. Adeo Internet Marketing published this infographic to show you why modern business needs [...]

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

The social media industry has revolutionized the online worlds, including the traditional methods to online marketing. Companies and businesses need to develop strategies of their own or they risk behind left in the dust by competitors.

Adeo Internet Marketing published this infographic to show you why modern business needs social media to help revitalize their online business and rise to the top.

See on www.businessinfographics.net

Enhanced by Zemanta

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

The social media industry has revolutionized the online worlds, including the traditional methods to online marketing. Companies and businesses need to develop strategies of their own or they risk behind left in the dust by competitors.

Adeo Internet Marketing published this infographic to show you why modern business needs social media to help revitalize their online business and rise to the top.

See on www.businessinfographics.net

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read the full article →

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See on Scoop.it – Aspiring Outliers A constant challenge for Internet marketers targeting Facebook has been gaining engagement. Generally brands and page admins have defined engagement as things such as likes, shares, and comments, but more importantly to gain reputation with Facebook’s algorithm. This infographic created by SocialMouths and American Express OPEN illustrates ways to [...]

15187_430815693632175_1272855164_n

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

A constant challenge for Internet marketers targeting Facebook has been gaining engagement. Generally brands and page admins have defined engagement as things such as likes, shares, and comments, but more importantly to gain reputation with Facebook’s algorithm.

This infographic created by SocialMouths and American Express OPEN illustrates ways to help make a Facebook page’s post a bit more popular through optimization of post elements such as short posts, the use of emoticons, the best times to post, and contest ideas…

See on marketaire.com

Enhanced by Zemanta

15187_430815693632175_1272855164_n

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

A constant challenge for Internet marketers targeting Facebook has been gaining engagement. Generally brands and page admins have defined engagement as things such as likes, shares, and comments, but more importantly to gain reputation with Facebook’s algorithm.

This infographic created by SocialMouths and American Express OPEN illustrates ways to help make a Facebook page’s post a bit more popular through optimization of post elements such as short posts, the use of emoticons, the best times to post, and contest ideas…

See on marketaire.com

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read the full article →

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