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On 21st April 2018, a local NGO, Anak IT, organised a workshop called “Cyber Security Workshop (I) – Cryptography” at the offices of Techone Global at K-Hub, Anggerek Desa. The objectives for this workshop were to have the basic understanding of cryptography and the different types of cryptography such as encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation. [...]

On 21st April 2018, a local NGO, Anak IT, organised a workshop called “Cyber Security Workshop (I) – Cryptography” at the offices of Techone Global at K-Hub, Anggerek Desa.

The objectives for this workshop were to have the basic understanding of cryptography and the different types of cryptography such as encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation. The speaker was Mohd Zulfadly Haji Ismail (founder of Anak IT).

The workshop was attended by 30 participants comprised of UTB, IGS, Politeknik, LCB and several private companies. The workshop started with opening speech by Mohd Zulfadly Haji Ismail (founder of Anak IT) to brief what Anak IT is all about and followed by safety briefing by the representative from TechOne Global.

The participants were taught the basic knowledge of cryptography which is categorized into 4, consisting of encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation.

On encoding, it was commonly used to transform data that can be properly consumed by any type of system. Examples of encoding are Base64, URL encoding, etc. On Encryption, participants were taught the difference between encoding and encryption. Where the difference is the goal of encryption is to ensure the data cannot be consumed by anyone other than the intended recipient. Examples of encryption are AES, 3DES, DES, etc. Meanwhile, for hashing, participants were taught that hashing is to take any input and produce a fixed-length string and it is a one way encryption. On obfuscation, participants were taught that it doesn’t securely hidden the source code but rather to add obstacle to the source code.

After the sharing session by the speaker on cryptography, the participants were given basic challenges on the subject intended.

To conclude the workshop, majority of the participants have acquired the basic understanding on cryptography which could benefit them for the upcoming capture the flag.

The workshop is supported by TechOne Global, ITPSS and BruCert.

On 21st April 2018, a local NGO, Anak IT, organised a workshop called “Cyber Security Workshop (I) – Cryptography” at the offices of Techone Global at K-Hub, Anggerek Desa.

The objectives for this workshop were to have the basic understanding of cryptography and the different types of cryptography such as encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation. The speaker was Mohd Zulfadly Haji Ismail (founder of Anak IT).

The workshop was attended by 30 participants comprised of UTB, IGS, Politeknik, LCB and several private companies. The workshop started with opening speech by Mohd Zulfadly Haji Ismail (founder of Anak IT) to brief what Anak IT is all about and followed by safety briefing by the representative from TechOne Global.

The participants were taught the basic knowledge of cryptography which is categorized into 4, consisting of encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation.

On encoding, it was commonly used to transform data that can be properly consumed by any type of system. Examples of encoding are Base64, URL encoding, etc. On Encryption, participants were taught the difference between encoding and encryption. Where the difference is the goal of encryption is to ensure the data cannot be consumed by anyone other than the intended recipient. Examples of encryption are AES, 3DES, DES, etc. Meanwhile, for hashing, participants were taught that hashing is to take any input and produce a fixed-length string and it is a one way encryption. On obfuscation, participants were taught that it doesn’t securely hidden the source code but rather to add obstacle to the source code.

After the sharing session by the speaker on cryptography, the participants were given basic challenges on the subject intended.

To conclude the workshop, majority of the participants have acquired the basic understanding on cryptography which could benefit them for the upcoming capture the flag.

The workshop is supported by TechOne Global, ITPSS and BruCert.

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Online Scams A scam is a way of cheating people intentionally without having to obtain someone’s personal details. Instead, it is the victim who usually gives away their personal information to the scammer. Here are some examples of scam: A common scam these days is when you receive a text message from an unknown number [...]

IG_Scam

Online Scams

A scam is a way of cheating people intentionally without having to obtain someone’s personal details. Instead, it is the victim who usually gives away their personal information to the scammer.

Here are some examples of scam:

A common scam these days is when you receive a text message from an unknown number saying that you have won a lot of money, and asking you to call them for details.

Another example of a scam is by email from an unknown sender saying that your colleague who is attending a course overseas has been robbed and is now in need of your help to get him back home. It also claims that he cannot contact you because all his things are gone, so he has asked someone to tell you about this matter. The email includes an account number so that you can send him the money, which he promises to pay you back.

The worst example is when you befriend someone through online chatting, who in fact is a scammer. After trust has been established, the scammer will make up stories that he had sent you a parcel containing a valuable gift but now the parcel is held up at the Customs office in his country and asked you to send money to his account in order to clear the parcel from Customs.

How can you protect yourself from being scammed?

  • Ignore and delete email or text messages from unknown senders
  • Never trust anyone you meet online
  • Don’t allow yourself to be pressured into making payments to unknown people
  • Always take your time in making a Remember that if something sounds too good to be true, it usually is.
  • Report it immediately if you think it is suspicious

How can I report a scam?

Contact the Royal Brunei Police Force’s Commercial Crime Investigation Division.

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

IG_Scam

Online Scams

A scam is a way of cheating people intentionally without having to obtain someone’s personal details. Instead, it is the victim who usually gives away their personal information to the scammer.

Here are some examples of scam:

A common scam these days is when you receive a text message from an unknown number saying that you have won a lot of money, and asking you to call them for details.

Another example of a scam is by email from an unknown sender saying that your colleague who is attending a course overseas has been robbed and is now in need of your help to get him back home. It also claims that he cannot contact you because all his things are gone, so he has asked someone to tell you about this matter. The email includes an account number so that you can send him the money, which he promises to pay you back.

The worst example is when you befriend someone through online chatting, who in fact is a scammer. After trust has been established, the scammer will make up stories that he had sent you a parcel containing a valuable gift but now the parcel is held up at the Customs office in his country and asked you to send money to his account in order to clear the parcel from Customs.

How can you protect yourself from being scammed?

  • Ignore and delete email or text messages from unknown senders
  • Never trust anyone you meet online
  • Don’t allow yourself to be pressured into making payments to unknown people
  • Always take your time in making a Remember that if something sounds too good to be true, it usually is.
  • Report it immediately if you think it is suspicious

How can I report a scam?

Contact the Royal Brunei Police Force’s Commercial Crime Investigation Division.

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

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Online shopping is a popular trend of buying products or services through the internet. The wide range of choices available online make it very attractive and convenient to shop from the comfort of your home. Are there any risks that people should be aware of? There are quite a lot of risks when shopping online, [...]

IG_OnlineShopping

Online shopping is a popular trend of buying products or services through the internet. The wide range of choices available online make it very attractive and convenient to shop from the comfort of your home.

Are there any risks that people should be aware of?

There are quite a lot of risks when shopping online, but I’d like to highlight the top 3 risks that everyone should be aware of.

  • Online scam is a way for people to cheat other people without having to obtain users’ personal info Instead, victims willingly give their personal information to scammers.
  • Phishing is another way of getting sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card
  • Identity theft is the act of impersonating someone else by using their personal information

How can you use online shopping safely?

Before you start online shopping:

  • Protect your personal information. When making a purchase online, be alert to the kind of information being collected to complete the transaction. Make sure you think it is necessary for the vendor to request that information. Remember, you only need to fill out required fields on a checkout form. Before providing your personal or financial information, check the website’s privacy policy. Make sure you understand how your information will be stored and used.
  • Keep a paper trail. Print and save records of your online transactions, including the product description, price, online receipt, terms of the sale, and copies of any email exchange with the seller. Check your credit card statements as soon as you get them, to make sure there aren’t any unauthorized charges. If there is a discrepancy, call your bank and report it.
  • Use familiar websites. Buy from well-known, trusted retailers. Go directly to the website of your choice, and do not click any links you get from emails or SMS, even if you are familiar with the website. Some attackers may create a fake website that looks very similar to the real website, so be careful not to fall into this kind of trap.
  • Know the vendor. Make sure the website or vendor is legitimate. One way to do this is to read reviews or testimonials by other users. For example, eBay allows customers to rate their vendors, so make sure to buy from a seller with high ratings.
  • Make sure the site is secure. Before you enter any personal details or payment information, look for signs that the site is secure. Make sure the payment page address begins with “https” and there is a locked padlock symbol on the browser. The ‘s’ stands for secure, and ensures the transaction is encrypted.
  • Never use unsecured wireless networks to make an online This includes Wi-Fi hotspots in public places such as cafes and hotels.
  • Use safe payment options such as PayPal or credit cards. Never send your bank or credit card details via email, as it’s not a secure method of transmitting financial information. Check your credit card statement frequently to make sure there aren’t any unauthorized charges. When making a payment to an individual seller, never transfer the money directly into their bank account. Instead, use a secure payment site such as PayPal.

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

IG_OnlineShopping

Online shopping is a popular trend of buying products or services through the internet. The wide range of choices available online make it very attractive and convenient to shop from the comfort of your home.

Are there any risks that people should be aware of?

There are quite a lot of risks when shopping online, but I’d like to highlight the top 3 risks that everyone should be aware of.

  • Online scam is a way for people to cheat other people without having to obtain users’ personal info Instead, victims willingly give their personal information to scammers.
  • Phishing is another way of getting sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card
  • Identity theft is the act of impersonating someone else by using their personal information

How can you use online shopping safely?

Before you start online shopping:

  • Protect your personal information. When making a purchase online, be alert to the kind of information being collected to complete the transaction. Make sure you think it is necessary for the vendor to request that information. Remember, you only need to fill out required fields on a checkout form. Before providing your personal or financial information, check the website’s privacy policy. Make sure you understand how your information will be stored and used.
  • Keep a paper trail. Print and save records of your online transactions, including the product description, price, online receipt, terms of the sale, and copies of any email exchange with the seller. Check your credit card statements as soon as you get them, to make sure there aren’t any unauthorized charges. If there is a discrepancy, call your bank and report it.
  • Use familiar websites. Buy from well-known, trusted retailers. Go directly to the website of your choice, and do not click any links you get from emails or SMS, even if you are familiar with the website. Some attackers may create a fake website that looks very similar to the real website, so be careful not to fall into this kind of trap.
  • Know the vendor. Make sure the website or vendor is legitimate. One way to do this is to read reviews or testimonials by other users. For example, eBay allows customers to rate their vendors, so make sure to buy from a seller with high ratings.
  • Make sure the site is secure. Before you enter any personal details or payment information, look for signs that the site is secure. Make sure the payment page address begins with “https” and there is a locked padlock symbol on the browser. The ‘s’ stands for secure, and ensures the transaction is encrypted.
  • Never use unsecured wireless networks to make an online This includes Wi-Fi hotspots in public places such as cafes and hotels.
  • Use safe payment options such as PayPal or credit cards. Never send your bank or credit card details via email, as it’s not a secure method of transmitting financial information. Check your credit card statement frequently to make sure there aren’t any unauthorized charges. When making a payment to an individual seller, never transfer the money directly into their bank account. Instead, use a secure payment site such as PayPal.

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

Read the full article →

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A sharing economy takes a variety of forms, often leveraging information technology to empower individuals, corporations, non-profits and government with information that enables distribution, sharing and reuse of excess capacity in goods and services. A common premise is that when information about goods is shared (typically via an online marketplace), the value of those goods [...]

A sharing economy takes a variety of forms, often leveraging information technology to empower individuals, corporations, non-profits and government with information that enables distribution, sharing and reuse of excess capacity in goods and services. A common premise is that when information about goods is shared (typically via an online marketplace), the value of those goods may increase, for the business, for individuals, and for the community.

Collaborative consumption as a phenomenon is a class of economic arrangements in which participants share access to products or services, rather than having individual ownership.

The collaborative consumption model is used in online marketplaces such as eBay as well as emerging sectors such as social lending, peer-to-peer accommodation, peer-to-peer travel experiences, peer-to-peer task assignments or travel advising, car sharing or commute-bus sharing.

More here.

collab-consumption-infographic

A sharing economy takes a variety of forms, often leveraging information technology to empower individuals, corporations, non-profits and government with information that enables distribution, sharing and reuse of excess capacity in goods and services. A common premise is that when information about goods is shared (typically via an online marketplace), the value of those goods may increase, for the business, for individuals, and for the community.

Collaborative consumption as a phenomenon is a class of economic arrangements in which participants share access to products or services, rather than having individual ownership.

The collaborative consumption model is used in online marketplaces such as eBay as well as emerging sectors such as social lending, peer-to-peer accommodation, peer-to-peer travel experiences, peer-to-peer task assignments or travel advising, car sharing or commute-bus sharing.

More here.

collab-consumption-infographic

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Fractl and Buzzstream surveyed 900 social media users to find out why users unfollow, and what behaviors companies should avoid. Earned media and customer engagement are two of the primary uses of social media for business, but why do people unfollow or unsubscribe? Source: www.adweek.com See on Scoop.it – Aspiring Outliers

Fractl and Buzzstream surveyed 900 social media users to find out why users unfollow, and what behaviors companies should avoid.

Earned media and customer engagement are two of the primary uses of social media for business, but why do people unfollow or unsubscribe?

Source: www.adweek.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Fractl and Buzzstream surveyed 900 social media users to find out why users unfollow, and what behaviors companies should avoid.

Earned media and customer engagement are two of the primary uses of social media for business, but why do people unfollow or unsubscribe?

Source: www.adweek.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

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See on Scoop.it – Aspiring Outliers Today the third major social network is becoming a public company. As with all major IPO’s, we will read a lot of diverse and conflicting opinions on its valuation: to some Twitter will be an overpriced money-losing startup, to others it will be the next major player of the [...]

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Today the third major social network is becoming a public company. As with all major IPO’s, we will read a lot of diverse and conflicting opinions on its valuation: to some Twitter will be an overpriced money-losing startup, to others it will be the next major player of the Web and undervalued. To add a data point to the debate, the Scoop.it team decided to study the value of social networks to small and mid-size businesses.

See on blog.scoop.it

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See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Today the third major social network is becoming a public company. As with all major IPO’s, we will read a lot of diverse and conflicting opinions on its valuation: to some Twitter will be an overpriced money-losing startup, to others it will be the next major player of the Web and undervalued. To add a data point to the debate, the Scoop.it team decided to study the value of social networks to small and mid-size businesses.

See on blog.scoop.it

Enhanced by Zemanta

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See on Scoop.it – Aspiring Outliers Every year, in every continent around the globe, more people are using social media to interact. Nearly 1 in 4 people in the world now use social networks. By 2016, eMarketer predicts that 2.55 billion people worldwide will use social networks. Top areas of growth? India, Indonesia, Mexico, China [...]

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Every year, in every continent around the globe, more people are using social media to interact. Nearly 1 in 4 people in the world now use social networks.

By 2016, eMarketer predicts that 2.55 billion people worldwide will use social networks. Top areas of growth? India, Indonesia, Mexico, China and Brazil.

Wishpond has put together an infographic featuring data on worldwide social-network use. Check it out to find out what parts of the world are likely to see the greatest growth.

See on www.entrepreneur.com

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See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Every year, in every continent around the globe, more people are using social media to interact. Nearly 1 in 4 people in the world now use social networks.

By 2016, eMarketer predicts that 2.55 billion people worldwide will use social networks. Top areas of growth? India, Indonesia, Mexico, China and Brazil.

Wishpond has put together an infographic featuring data on worldwide social-network use. Check it out to find out what parts of the world are likely to see the greatest growth.

See on www.entrepreneur.com

Enhanced by Zemanta

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See on Scoop.it – Aspiring Outliers Many people are concerned about online privacy. And, conversely, many more are not, freely sharing any and everything on their favorite social networks, paying little attention to their mobile app settings, and happily letting Google track each keyword that they search. It’s easy to get paranoid about all this [...]

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Many people are concerned about online privacy. And, conversely, many more are not, freely sharing any and everything on their favorite social networks, paying little attention to their mobile app settings, and happily letting Google track each keyword that they search.

It’s easy to get paranoid about all this stuff, but it does pay to be a little careful when using the internet, particularly when it comes to your personal safety. And while Twitter holds pride of place as one of the safest social networks, by taking the time to educate yourself on the security and privacy settings within your profile, being mindful of which third-party apps you allow access to your account and ensuring that you aren’t making it easy for burglars by constantly telling the world when you’re not at home, you can rest assured that you’re doing everything you can to keep your presence safe on Twitter.

This infographic proposes 9 tips for keeping your internet usage private.

See on www.mediabistro.com

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See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Many people are concerned about online privacy. And, conversely, many more are not, freely sharing any and everything on their favorite social networks, paying little attention to their mobile app settings, and happily letting Google track each keyword that they search.

It’s easy to get paranoid about all this stuff, but it does pay to be a little careful when using the internet, particularly when it comes to your personal safety. And while Twitter holds pride of place as one of the safest social networks, by taking the time to educate yourself on the security and privacy settings within your profile, being mindful of which third-party apps you allow access to your account and ensuring that you aren’t making it easy for burglars by constantly telling the world when you’re not at home, you can rest assured that you’re doing everything you can to keep your presence safe on Twitter.

This infographic proposes 9 tips for keeping your internet usage private.

See on www.mediabistro.com

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See on Scoop.it – Aspiring Outliers Much has been written about how to write the perfect tweet, from what link shortener to use to how many characters to leave room for retweets. Now the folks at Neomobile have tried their hand at creating a guide to composing the perfect tweet. See on www.mediabistro.com

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Much has been written about how to write the perfect tweet, from what link shortener to use to how many characters to leave room for retweets.

Now the folks at Neomobile have tried their hand at creating a guide to composing the perfect tweet.

See on www.mediabistro.com

Enhanced by Zemanta

See on Scoop.itAspiring Outliers

Much has been written about how to write the perfect tweet, from what link shortener to use to how many characters to leave room for retweets.

Now the folks at Neomobile have tried their hand at creating a guide to composing the perfect tweet.

See on www.mediabistro.com

Enhanced by Zemanta

Read the full article →

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