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As part of BIBD’s efforts to support the de-cashing of the economy with seamless transactions, BIBD has already introduced digital conveniences such as BIBD Quickpay for QR code payments, BIBD vCard or Virtual Mastercard, its Mastercard Contactless and Visa payWave under its BIBD NEXGEN platform.

As part of BIBD’s efforts to support the de-cashing of the economy with seamless transactions, BIBD has already introduced digital conveniences such as BIBD Quickpay for QR code payments, BIBD vCard or Virtual Mastercard, its Mastercard Contactless and Visa payWave under its BIBD NEXGEN platform.

At the same time, BIBD is keen to partner with local institutions to create alliances to improve access and create more opportunities for the ease of doing business in Brunei Darussalam, while improving the infrastructure for a faster and more secure digital economy. Its first alliance came earlier in the year by powering Progresif Pay, Progresif’s digital payment solution.

Head of Retail Banking, Hjh Nurul Akmar Hj Md Jaafar demonstrating BIBD Quickpay to the media. The feature will be made available to BIBD mobile users in the new year.

As the demand for ease of payments from customers and merchants increase as a reflection of Brunei Darussalam’s smart society with among the highest social media penetration and mobile phone penetration, BIBD will always be on the lookout for digital innovations to complement its suite of digital payment solutions. Not far from the horizon, BIBD will be introducing the latest version of its BIBD NEXGEN Mobile app which will include its latest payment convenience: the BIBD NEXGEN Wallet.

BIBD, leading this digital initiative will be open to other wallet and payment solutions such as Apple Pay and Google Pay, and would gauge our further investments within this based on the public’s adoption to the cashless economy and smart nation initiative.

Paying made easy by BIBD NEXGEN Wallet

A first for Brunei Darussalam, the BIBD NEXGEN Wallet will allow BIBD customers to perform NFC (Near Field Communication) payments using their NFC supported android devices at merchants via the BIBD NEXGEN Mobile application.

This latest technological addition creates a fast and secure alternative to cash payments as the supporting technology and security makes payments seamless, with the added benefit of allowing payments to be made offline (without access to the internet). This can be used at any contactless-enabled terminal at more than thirty million merchants worldwide.

[continue reading…]

As part of BIBD’s efforts to support the de-cashing of the economy with seamless transactions, BIBD has already introduced digital conveniences such as BIBD Quickpay for QR code payments, BIBD vCard or Virtual Mastercard, its Mastercard Contactless and Visa payWave under its BIBD NEXGEN platform.

At the same time, BIBD is keen to partner with local institutions to create alliances to improve access and create more opportunities for the ease of doing business in Brunei Darussalam, while improving the infrastructure for a faster and more secure digital economy. Its first alliance came earlier in the year by powering Progresif Pay, Progresif’s digital payment solution.

Head of Retail Banking, Hjh Nurul Akmar Hj Md Jaafar demonstrating BIBD Quickpay to the media. The feature will be made available to BIBD mobile users in the new year.

As the demand for ease of payments from customers and merchants increase as a reflection of Brunei Darussalam’s smart society with among the highest social media penetration and mobile phone penetration, BIBD will always be on the lookout for digital innovations to complement its suite of digital payment solutions. Not far from the horizon, BIBD will be introducing the latest version of its BIBD NEXGEN Mobile app which will include its latest payment convenience: the BIBD NEXGEN Wallet.

BIBD, leading this digital initiative will be open to other wallet and payment solutions such as Apple Pay and Google Pay, and would gauge our further investments within this based on the public’s adoption to the cashless economy and smart nation initiative.

Paying made easy by BIBD NEXGEN Wallet

A first for Brunei Darussalam, the BIBD NEXGEN Wallet will allow BIBD customers to perform NFC (Near Field Communication) payments using their NFC supported android devices at merchants via the BIBD NEXGEN Mobile application.

This latest technological addition creates a fast and secure alternative to cash payments as the supporting technology and security makes payments seamless, with the added benefit of allowing payments to be made offline (without access to the internet). This can be used at any contactless-enabled terminal at more than thirty million merchants worldwide.

(more…)

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On 21st April 2018, a local NGO, Anak IT, organised a workshop called “Cyber Security Workshop (I) – Cryptography” at the offices of Techone Global at K-Hub, Anggerek Desa. The objectives for this workshop were to have the basic understanding of cryptography and the different types of cryptography such as encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation. [...]

On 21st April 2018, a local NGO, Anak IT, organised a workshop called “Cyber Security Workshop (I) – Cryptography” at the offices of Techone Global at K-Hub, Anggerek Desa.

The objectives for this workshop were to have the basic understanding of cryptography and the different types of cryptography such as encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation. The speaker was Mohd Zulfadly Haji Ismail (founder of Anak IT).

The workshop was attended by 30 participants comprised of UTB, IGS, Politeknik, LCB and several private companies. The workshop started with opening speech by Mohd Zulfadly Haji Ismail (founder of Anak IT) to brief what Anak IT is all about and followed by safety briefing by the representative from TechOne Global.

The participants were taught the basic knowledge of cryptography which is categorized into 4, consisting of encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation.

On encoding, it was commonly used to transform data that can be properly consumed by any type of system. Examples of encoding are Base64, URL encoding, etc. On Encryption, participants were taught the difference between encoding and encryption. Where the difference is the goal of encryption is to ensure the data cannot be consumed by anyone other than the intended recipient. Examples of encryption are AES, 3DES, DES, etc. Meanwhile, for hashing, participants were taught that hashing is to take any input and produce a fixed-length string and it is a one way encryption. On obfuscation, participants were taught that it doesn’t securely hidden the source code but rather to add obstacle to the source code.

After the sharing session by the speaker on cryptography, the participants were given basic challenges on the subject intended.

To conclude the workshop, majority of the participants have acquired the basic understanding on cryptography which could benefit them for the upcoming capture the flag.

The workshop is supported by TechOne Global, ITPSS and BruCert.

On 21st April 2018, a local NGO, Anak IT, organised a workshop called “Cyber Security Workshop (I) – Cryptography” at the offices of Techone Global at K-Hub, Anggerek Desa.

The objectives for this workshop were to have the basic understanding of cryptography and the different types of cryptography such as encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation. The speaker was Mohd Zulfadly Haji Ismail (founder of Anak IT).

The workshop was attended by 30 participants comprised of UTB, IGS, Politeknik, LCB and several private companies. The workshop started with opening speech by Mohd Zulfadly Haji Ismail (founder of Anak IT) to brief what Anak IT is all about and followed by safety briefing by the representative from TechOne Global.

The participants were taught the basic knowledge of cryptography which is categorized into 4, consisting of encoding, encryption, hashing and obfuscation.

On encoding, it was commonly used to transform data that can be properly consumed by any type of system. Examples of encoding are Base64, URL encoding, etc. On Encryption, participants were taught the difference between encoding and encryption. Where the difference is the goal of encryption is to ensure the data cannot be consumed by anyone other than the intended recipient. Examples of encryption are AES, 3DES, DES, etc. Meanwhile, for hashing, participants were taught that hashing is to take any input and produce a fixed-length string and it is a one way encryption. On obfuscation, participants were taught that it doesn’t securely hidden the source code but rather to add obstacle to the source code.

After the sharing session by the speaker on cryptography, the participants were given basic challenges on the subject intended.

To conclude the workshop, majority of the participants have acquired the basic understanding on cryptography which could benefit them for the upcoming capture the flag.

The workshop is supported by TechOne Global, ITPSS and BruCert.

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The Brunei contingents to the Shell Eco-marathon Asia (SEMA) 2018 comprising of students from Universiti Brunei Darussalam (UBD), Universiti Teknologi Brunei (UTB) and Politeknik Brunei (PB) today joined over 120 student teams from 18 countries across Asia Pacific and the Middle East, to compete in this year’s competition held at the Changi Exhibition Centre in [...]

Brunei teams successfully passed safety and technical inspection

The Brunei contingents to the Shell Eco-marathon Asia (SEMA) 2018 comprising of students from Universiti Brunei Darussalam (UBD), Universiti Teknologi Brunei (UTB) and Politeknik Brunei (PB) today joined over 120 student teams from 18 countries across Asia Pacific and the Middle East, to compete in this year’s competition held at the Changi Exhibition Centre in Singapore held from 8th-11th March 2018. Brunei’s participation to the event is greatly supported by Brunei Shell Petroleum Co Sdn Bhd (BSP) in collaboration with the Ministry of Education (MOE) through UBD, UTB and PB.

Shell Eco-marathon is a competition for students who are passionate about developing innovative mobility solutions. It challenges engineering, design, science and technology students to design, build and drive the world’s most energy-efficient vehicle.

This year, the Brunei teams will be participating in one category which is the Prototype category – futuristic and highly aerodynamic vehicles.

Following a very intensive safety and technical inspection check held three days ago, all three proudly Brunei self-built vehicles by the students made it through with flying colours, ready to race the track.

Politeknik Brunei – (Photo Credit – Shaun Tay – AP Images for Shell)

Team Politeknik Brunei’s “Yakin 2” went through four attempts out of the standard allowed which was five before the final day. The third attempt was their best record for today’s race at 117km/kWh. On seat driving “Yakin 2” at the race track was Nurul Ramizah Binti Ramlee.

UBD – (Photo Credit – Shaun Tay – AP Images for Shell)

Gendeavour’37 driven by Fatin Amanina binti Awang Haji Abd Azis from Team UBD completed the nine laps and finishing strong with an efficiency of 116km/kWh. Despite the challenges faced during the first attempt, the team was even more than ready to rise up to the challenge to beat the odds. Keeping the spirits high and looking forward to winning, the focus now is to work harder and push their limits to achieve better.

UTB – (Photo Credit – Shaun Tay – AP Images for Shell)

Meanwhile, UTB’s Pahlawan III.X has been scheduled to race in the finals joining the other two Brunei teams against the vehicles from the similar category that will be driven by Hamiz ‘Abdulhadi bin Haji Osman.

To follow the journey of the teams, you can follow their Instagram accounts @ubdsem, @utb.sem and @polybrusem

Brunei teams successfully passed safety and technical inspection

The Brunei contingents to the Shell Eco-marathon Asia (SEMA) 2018 comprising of students from Universiti Brunei Darussalam (UBD), Universiti Teknologi Brunei (UTB) and Politeknik Brunei (PB) today joined over 120 student teams from 18 countries across Asia Pacific and the Middle East, to compete in this year’s competition held at the Changi Exhibition Centre in Singapore held from 8th-11th March 2018. Brunei’s participation to the event is greatly supported by Brunei Shell Petroleum Co Sdn Bhd (BSP) in collaboration with the Ministry of Education (MOE) through UBD, UTB and PB.

Shell Eco-marathon is a competition for students who are passionate about developing innovative mobility solutions. It challenges engineering, design, science and technology students to design, build and drive the world’s most energy-efficient vehicle.

This year, the Brunei teams will be participating in one category which is the Prototype category – futuristic and highly aerodynamic vehicles.

Following a very intensive safety and technical inspection check held three days ago, all three proudly Brunei self-built vehicles by the students made it through with flying colours, ready to race the track.

Politeknik Brunei – (Photo Credit – Shaun Tay – AP Images for Shell)

Team Politeknik Brunei’s “Yakin 2” went through four attempts out of the standard allowed which was five before the final day. The third attempt was their best record for today’s race at 117km/kWh. On seat driving “Yakin 2” at the race track was Nurul Ramizah Binti Ramlee.

UBD – (Photo Credit – Shaun Tay – AP Images for Shell)

Gendeavour’37 driven by Fatin Amanina binti Awang Haji Abd Azis from Team UBD completed the nine laps and finishing strong with an efficiency of 116km/kWh. Despite the challenges faced during the first attempt, the team was even more than ready to rise up to the challenge to beat the odds. Keeping the spirits high and looking forward to winning, the focus now is to work harder and push their limits to achieve better.

UTB – (Photo Credit – Shaun Tay – AP Images for Shell)

Meanwhile, UTB’s Pahlawan III.X has been scheduled to race in the finals joining the other two Brunei teams against the vehicles from the similar category that will be driven by Hamiz ‘Abdulhadi bin Haji Osman.

To follow the journey of the teams, you can follow their Instagram accounts @ubdsem, @utb.sem and @polybrusem

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Ok so this is a little post which I was working on for a local publication but never did get to finish for one reason or another. Its supposed to chronicle my car audio journey from back in the day up to the present day. It’s incomplete but I’m open to comments and input from [...]

Ok so this is a little post which I was working on for a local publication but never did get to finish for one reason or another. Its supposed to chronicle my car audio journey from back in the day up to the present day. It’s incomplete but I’m open to comments and input from those who went through the same good times!

Here goes:

In the 80’s, I was first exposed to car audio systems in the 80’s, the good old says of tricked up Celicas, Corollas, Coronas and Carinas with their lowered suspensions (often achieved not by replacing the coils and shocks but via this dubious method called “potong spring”) and fat 13 or 14 inch rims better known as “Apache”. I fondly remember many a time riding in the cars of older cousins or friends and bobbing up and down to the disco beats of Donna Summer or rocking to the sound of Iron Maiden.

Rim 13 inchi ragat yo

Pioneer Lapan Lapan

Back in those days, the head unit of choice was the Pioneer KP-88G or better known as “Lapan-lapan” paired with a pair of 2 or 3-ways and of course, a pair of tweeters mounted on the A-pillars. That completed the audio requirement for a bonafide swag ride. You would drive around with windows down and the sounds of Boney-M or Scorpions not so much booming but hissing from your car (Lacis-lacis nya orang, hahah).

In the 90’s, as I entered driving age, car audio systems like the Pioneer 88’s began to disappear and in their place, swanky new European systems from the likes of Blaupunkt became dujour. The blue dot could be found in many a car, including my parents’ Volvo 760 wagon and my sister’s BMW 320i. The head unit was naturally coupled with a “Cobra” neck equalizer, which made for a rather futuristic looking setup.

Blaupunkt with gooseneck equalizer

Coming soon…

  • Mitsubishi Pajero and the speaker tong story
  • Nissan Patrol and the ultimate boombox
  • My Mitsubishi Wagon and the Alpine setup

  • Falcon and the Rockford Fosgate system

2000’s

  • Closely followed but no longer interested
  • Mazda and the Kenwood plus little sub
  • Downhill from there…

Ok so this is a little post which I was working on for a local publication but never did get to finish for one reason or another. Its supposed to chronicle my car audio journey from back in the day up to the present day. It’s incomplete but I’m open to comments and input from those who went through the same good times!

Here goes:

In the 80’s, I was first exposed to car audio systems in the 80’s, the good old says of tricked up Celicas, Corollas, Coronas and Carinas with their lowered suspensions (often achieved not by replacing the coils and shocks but via this dubious method called “potong spring”) and fat 13 or 14 inch rims better known as “Apache”. I fondly remember many a time riding in the cars of older cousins or friends and bobbing up and down to the disco beats of Donna Summer or rocking to the sound of Iron Maiden.

Rim 13 inchi ragat yo

Pioneer Lapan Lapan

Back in those days, the head unit of choice was the Pioneer KP-88G or better known as “Lapan-lapan” paired with a pair of 2 or 3-ways and of course, a pair of tweeters mounted on the A-pillars. That completed the audio requirement for a bonafide swag ride. You would drive around with windows down and the sounds of Boney-M or Scorpions not so much booming but hissing from your car (Lacis-lacis nya orang, hahah).

In the 90’s, as I entered driving age, car audio systems like the Pioneer 88’s began to disappear and in their place, swanky new European systems from the likes of Blaupunkt became dujour. The blue dot could be found in many a car, including my parents’ Volvo 760 wagon and my sister’s BMW 320i. The head unit was naturally coupled with a “Cobra” neck equalizer, which made for a rather futuristic looking setup.

Blaupunkt with gooseneck equalizer

Coming soon…

  • Mitsubishi Pajero and the speaker tong story
  • Nissan Patrol and the ultimate boombox
  • My Mitsubishi Wagon and the Alpine setup

  • Falcon and the Rockford Fosgate system

2000’s

  • Closely followed but no longer interested
  • Mazda and the Kenwood plus little sub
  • Downhill from there…

Read the full article →

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All vehicles must pass a set of technical inspections before they are allowed onto the Shell Eco-Marathon Asia 2016 competition circuit to see how far they can go on the least amount of fuel, and potentially achieve the highest mileage in the competition. Today after much work both Universiti Brunei Darussalam (UBD) GenNext Pejuang and [...]

All vehicles must pass a set of technical inspections before they are allowed onto the Shell Eco-Marathon Asia 2016 competition circuit to see how far they can go on the least amount of fuel, and potentially achieve the highest mileage in the competition.

Today after much work both Universiti Brunei Darussalam (UBD) GenNext Pejuang and Universiti Teknologi Brunei (UTB) ITB One-U are proud to receive their technical and safety inspection stickers.

After passing their inspections from redesigning their braking system, more challenges were faced by ITB One-U during their trial run.

The FT-02, #23, a gasoline prototype vehicle from team Go Viridis at the Government Engineering College Barton Hill in Trivandrum, India, runs in front of The Nakhoda, #204, a hydrogen prototype vehicle from team GenNext Pejuang at the Universiti Brunei Darussalam in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam, on the track during day three of the Shell Eco-marathon Asia in Manila, Philippines, Saturday, March 5, 2016. (Jinggo Montenejo  via AP Images)

The FT-02, #23, a gasoline prototype vehicle from team Go Viridis at the Government Engineering College Barton Hill in Trivandrum, India, runs in front of The Nakhoda, #204, a hydrogen prototype vehicle from team GenNext Pejuang at the Universiti Brunei Darussalam in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam, on the track during day three of the Shell Eco-marathon Asia in Manila, Philippines, Saturday, March 5, 2016. (Jinggo Montenejo via AP Images)

According to one of the Mechanical students, Ahmad Amthali, “We fixed the brake system with new brake layout and fixed all of it and we managed to pass the brake system inspection this morning. However, when we went to do the pre-test run, Pahlawan II’s tyres burst and we had to go out to buy new tyres from the shops which costs us two hours.

We are honoured to be able to represent UTB and Brunei in such prestigious event. We will do our very best for UTB and Brunei.”
UBD GenNext Pejuang passed their technical and safety inspection after several attempts to pass the stringent hydrogen fuel cell system inspection.

Once the Nakhoda’s hydrogen system sequence was in place, the team had to readjust its hydrogen sensor’s sensitivity and rewire its capacitor to ensure easy access to read Nakhoda’s voltage.

Team UTB after passing the technical inspection

“Our issue was with the hydrogen system sequence, which took a while to fix. We were in the technical inspection for an hour and a half before we finally passed! At 1.30pm, I went on the track for my first attempt, however after the 7th lap, I had to return to my team as we had run out of time. We are going to make some changes to the gearing system to speed up the car,” said Amirah Salamat, Nakhoda’s driver.

Although faced with unforeseen challenges, the students continue to show enthusiasm and determination by endlessly making adjustments to their vehicles. They hope to achieve a valid official record on the track tomorrow as it will be the last day of the competition.

Team UTB checking the tyre inflation-1

In addition to awards for achievements on the track, students are also vying for five Off-Track awards that test the team’s creativity and technical skills, as well as their approaches to safety and sustainability. These awards are in the following categories: Communications, Vehicle Design, Technical Innovation, Safety and Perseverance and Spirit of the Event.

As of noon today, over 80 student teams have passed the technical inspection. Student teams have today and tomorrow to record their attempts on the circuit. The final results will be tabulated and announced at the closing awards ceremony tomorrow.
Shell Eco-marathon 2016 shows Shell’s commitment to helping the world meet its growing energy needs in a responsible way, bringing together students, partners and the public.

To follow the journey of both teams, you can follow their Instagram accounts @ubdsem and @itb.sem.

About Shell Eco-marathon

Shell Eco-marathon began in 1939 at a Shell research laboratory in the United States as a friendly wager between scientists to see who could get the most miles per gallon from their vehicle. The winner of that contest barely achieved 50 mpg (21 km/l), and from these humble origins, a more organized competition evolved. In 1985 in France, Shell Eco-marathon as we know it today was born. In April 2007, the Shell Eco-marathon Americas event was launched in the United States, and in 2010, the inaugural Shell Eco-marathon Asia was held in Malaysia, up until 2013. Since 2014, the event has been held in Manila, Philippines, which will continue to host the event until 2016.

All vehicles must pass a set of technical inspections before they are allowed onto the Shell Eco-Marathon Asia 2016 competition circuit to see how far they can go on the least amount of fuel, and potentially achieve the highest mileage in the competition.

Today after much work both Universiti Brunei Darussalam (UBD) GenNext Pejuang and Universiti Teknologi Brunei (UTB) ITB One-U are proud to receive their technical and safety inspection stickers.

After passing their inspections from redesigning their braking system, more challenges were faced by ITB One-U during their trial run.

The FT-02, #23, a gasoline prototype vehicle from team Go Viridis at the Government Engineering College Barton Hill in Trivandrum, India, runs in front of The Nakhoda, #204, a hydrogen prototype vehicle from team GenNext Pejuang at the Universiti Brunei Darussalam in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam, on the track during day three of the Shell Eco-marathon Asia in Manila, Philippines, Saturday, March 5, 2016. (Jinggo Montenejo  via AP Images)

The FT-02, #23, a gasoline prototype vehicle from team Go Viridis at the Government Engineering College Barton Hill in Trivandrum, India, runs in front of The Nakhoda, #204, a hydrogen prototype vehicle from team GenNext Pejuang at the Universiti Brunei Darussalam in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam, on the track during day three of the Shell Eco-marathon Asia in Manila, Philippines, Saturday, March 5, 2016. (Jinggo Montenejo via AP Images)

According to one of the Mechanical students, Ahmad Amthali, “We fixed the brake system with new brake layout and fixed all of it and we managed to pass the brake system inspection this morning. However, when we went to do the pre-test run, Pahlawan II’s tyres burst and we had to go out to buy new tyres from the shops which costs us two hours.

We are honoured to be able to represent UTB and Brunei in such prestigious event. We will do our very best for UTB and Brunei.”
UBD GenNext Pejuang passed their technical and safety inspection after several attempts to pass the stringent hydrogen fuel cell system inspection.

Once the Nakhoda’s hydrogen system sequence was in place, the team had to readjust its hydrogen sensor’s sensitivity and rewire its capacitor to ensure easy access to read Nakhoda’s voltage.

Team UTB after passing the technical inspection

“Our issue was with the hydrogen system sequence, which took a while to fix. We were in the technical inspection for an hour and a half before we finally passed! At 1.30pm, I went on the track for my first attempt, however after the 7th lap, I had to return to my team as we had run out of time. We are going to make some changes to the gearing system to speed up the car,” said Amirah Salamat, Nakhoda’s driver.

Although faced with unforeseen challenges, the students continue to show enthusiasm and determination by endlessly making adjustments to their vehicles. They hope to achieve a valid official record on the track tomorrow as it will be the last day of the competition.

Team UTB checking the tyre inflation-1

In addition to awards for achievements on the track, students are also vying for five Off-Track awards that test the team’s creativity and technical skills, as well as their approaches to safety and sustainability. These awards are in the following categories: Communications, Vehicle Design, Technical Innovation, Safety and Perseverance and Spirit of the Event.

As of noon today, over 80 student teams have passed the technical inspection. Student teams have today and tomorrow to record their attempts on the circuit. The final results will be tabulated and announced at the closing awards ceremony tomorrow.
Shell Eco-marathon 2016 shows Shell’s commitment to helping the world meet its growing energy needs in a responsible way, bringing together students, partners and the public.

To follow the journey of both teams, you can follow their Instagram accounts @ubdsem and @itb.sem.

About Shell Eco-marathon

Shell Eco-marathon began in 1939 at a Shell research laboratory in the United States as a friendly wager between scientists to see who could get the most miles per gallon from their vehicle. The winner of that contest barely achieved 50 mpg (21 km/l), and from these humble origins, a more organized competition evolved. In 1985 in France, Shell Eco-marathon as we know it today was born. In April 2007, the Shell Eco-marathon Americas event was launched in the United States, and in 2010, the inaugural Shell Eco-marathon Asia was held in Malaysia, up until 2013. Since 2014, the event has been held in Manila, Philippines, which will continue to host the event until 2016.

Read the full article →

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Cloud storage provides a space for you to store your data on the Internet. It’s a very convenient way to back up your important data. Some examples of cloud storage are iCloud, Dropbox or Google Drive. What are the advantages of using Cloud Storage? You can access your data anywhere and at any time, as [...]

IG_CloudStorage

Cloud storage provides a space for you to store your data on the Internet. It’s a very convenient way to back up your important data. Some examples of cloud storage are iCloud, Dropbox or Google Drive.

What are the advantages of using Cloud Storage?

  • You can access your data anywhere and at any time, as long as you have an Internet connection.
  • It’s also an easy way to share your data with other people, and a great place to store back up data because you don’t have to worry about lost or damaged hard drives.
  • To expand your storage space, there’s no need to buy a new hard drive, you could just buy additional storage space from your service provider.

Are there any drawbacks of using cloud storage?

  • It’s not a good choice if you have problems with Internet connection.
  • Uploading or downloading large volumes of data would be time-consuming and would increase your Internet usage.

Is it safe to use Cloud Storage?

As with anything related to the Internet, it’s important to keep security in mind when using cloud services. This includes good password management and keeping your computer or devices free of viruses and malware.

IG_CloudStorage

Cloud storage provides a space for you to store your data on the Internet. It’s a very convenient way to back up your important data. Some examples of cloud storage are iCloud, Dropbox or Google Drive.

What are the advantages of using Cloud Storage?

  • You can access your data anywhere and at any time, as long as you have an Internet connection.
  • It’s also an easy way to share your data with other people, and a great place to store back up data because you don’t have to worry about lost or damaged hard drives.
  • To expand your storage space, there’s no need to buy a new hard drive, you could just buy additional storage space from your service provider.

Are there any drawbacks of using cloud storage?

  • It’s not a good choice if you have problems with Internet connection.
  • Uploading or downloading large volumes of data would be time-consuming and would increase your Internet usage.

Is it safe to use Cloud Storage?

As with anything related to the Internet, it’s important to keep security in mind when using cloud services. This includes good password management and keeping your computer or devices free of viruses and malware.

Read the full article →

{ 0 comments }

Phishing is a method of stealing your financial or confidential information though the Internet such as username, password and credit card details. It is usually carried out through email or instant messaging, by pretending to be someone trustworthy such as a financial institution or other organization. An example of phishing is when you receive an [...]

IG_Phishing

Phishing is a method of stealing your financial or confidential information though the Internet such as username, password and credit card details. It is usually carried out through email or instant messaging, by pretending to be someone trustworthy such as a financial institution or other organization.

An example of phishing is when you receive an email or text message from an unknown sender who claims to be from your bank. The message might ask you to click on a link in order to change your online banking password on their new system.

How can I tell whether a website or message is a Phishing attempt?

  • They use standard greetings such as “Dear user”
  • They usually contain bad spelling and grammar
  • They use fake Hover over a link or tap and hold it on a mobile device to see its destination. If the link doesn’t look like a legitimate website, don’t click on it.
  • The logo or page design is wrong, out of date or out of p
  • They threaten to close your account if you do not reset your
  • They request for financial or personal in

How can I avoid falling victim to Phishing?

  • Delete email and text messages that ask you to provide personal information such as credit card or bank account numbers or pass Legitimate companies will not ask for this information via email or text.
  • Do not reply, and do not click on links or call phone numbers provided in the message, either. These messages direct you to spoof sites – sites that look real but whose purpose is to steal your information so a scammer can commit crimes in your
  • If you are worried about your account or need to contact an organization you do business with, call the number on your financial statements or on the back of your credit

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

IG_Phishing

Phishing is a method of stealing your financial or confidential information though the Internet such as username, password and credit card details. It is usually carried out through email or instant messaging, by pretending to be someone trustworthy such as a financial institution or other organization.

An example of phishing is when you receive an email or text message from an unknown sender who claims to be from your bank. The message might ask you to click on a link in order to change your online banking password on their new system.

How can I tell whether a website or message is a Phishing attempt?

  • They use standard greetings such as “Dear user”
  • They usually contain bad spelling and grammar
  • They use fake Hover over a link or tap and hold it on a mobile device to see its destination. If the link doesn’t look like a legitimate website, don’t click on it.
  • The logo or page design is wrong, out of date or out of p
  • They threaten to close your account if you do not reset your
  • They request for financial or personal in

How can I avoid falling victim to Phishing?

  • Delete email and text messages that ask you to provide personal information such as credit card or bank account numbers or pass Legitimate companies will not ask for this information via email or text.
  • Do not reply, and do not click on links or call phone numbers provided in the message, either. These messages direct you to spoof sites – sites that look real but whose purpose is to steal your information so a scammer can commit crimes in your
  • If you are worried about your account or need to contact an organization you do business with, call the number on your financial statements or on the back of your credit

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

Read the full article →

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Online Scams A scam is a way of cheating people intentionally without having to obtain someone’s personal details. Instead, it is the victim who usually gives away their personal information to the scammer. Here are some examples of scam: A common scam these days is when you receive a text message from an unknown number [...]

IG_Scam

Online Scams

A scam is a way of cheating people intentionally without having to obtain someone’s personal details. Instead, it is the victim who usually gives away their personal information to the scammer.

Here are some examples of scam:

A common scam these days is when you receive a text message from an unknown number saying that you have won a lot of money, and asking you to call them for details.

Another example of a scam is by email from an unknown sender saying that your colleague who is attending a course overseas has been robbed and is now in need of your help to get him back home. It also claims that he cannot contact you because all his things are gone, so he has asked someone to tell you about this matter. The email includes an account number so that you can send him the money, which he promises to pay you back.

The worst example is when you befriend someone through online chatting, who in fact is a scammer. After trust has been established, the scammer will make up stories that he had sent you a parcel containing a valuable gift but now the parcel is held up at the Customs office in his country and asked you to send money to his account in order to clear the parcel from Customs.

How can you protect yourself from being scammed?

  • Ignore and delete email or text messages from unknown senders
  • Never trust anyone you meet online
  • Don’t allow yourself to be pressured into making payments to unknown people
  • Always take your time in making a Remember that if something sounds too good to be true, it usually is.
  • Report it immediately if you think it is suspicious

How can I report a scam?

Contact the Royal Brunei Police Force’s Commercial Crime Investigation Division.

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

IG_Scam

Online Scams

A scam is a way of cheating people intentionally without having to obtain someone’s personal details. Instead, it is the victim who usually gives away their personal information to the scammer.

Here are some examples of scam:

A common scam these days is when you receive a text message from an unknown number saying that you have won a lot of money, and asking you to call them for details.

Another example of a scam is by email from an unknown sender saying that your colleague who is attending a course overseas has been robbed and is now in need of your help to get him back home. It also claims that he cannot contact you because all his things are gone, so he has asked someone to tell you about this matter. The email includes an account number so that you can send him the money, which he promises to pay you back.

The worst example is when you befriend someone through online chatting, who in fact is a scammer. After trust has been established, the scammer will make up stories that he had sent you a parcel containing a valuable gift but now the parcel is held up at the Customs office in his country and asked you to send money to his account in order to clear the parcel from Customs.

How can you protect yourself from being scammed?

  • Ignore and delete email or text messages from unknown senders
  • Never trust anyone you meet online
  • Don’t allow yourself to be pressured into making payments to unknown people
  • Always take your time in making a Remember that if something sounds too good to be true, it usually is.
  • Report it immediately if you think it is suspicious

How can I report a scam?

Contact the Royal Brunei Police Force’s Commercial Crime Investigation Division.

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

Read the full article →

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Online shopping is a popular trend of buying products or services through the internet. The wide range of choices available online make it very attractive and convenient to shop from the comfort of your home. Are there any risks that people should be aware of? There are quite a lot of risks when shopping online, [...]

IG_OnlineShopping

Online shopping is a popular trend of buying products or services through the internet. The wide range of choices available online make it very attractive and convenient to shop from the comfort of your home.

Are there any risks that people should be aware of?

There are quite a lot of risks when shopping online, but I’d like to highlight the top 3 risks that everyone should be aware of.

  • Online scam is a way for people to cheat other people without having to obtain users’ personal info Instead, victims willingly give their personal information to scammers.
  • Phishing is another way of getting sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card
  • Identity theft is the act of impersonating someone else by using their personal information

How can you use online shopping safely?

Before you start online shopping:

  • Protect your personal information. When making a purchase online, be alert to the kind of information being collected to complete the transaction. Make sure you think it is necessary for the vendor to request that information. Remember, you only need to fill out required fields on a checkout form. Before providing your personal or financial information, check the website’s privacy policy. Make sure you understand how your information will be stored and used.
  • Keep a paper trail. Print and save records of your online transactions, including the product description, price, online receipt, terms of the sale, and copies of any email exchange with the seller. Check your credit card statements as soon as you get them, to make sure there aren’t any unauthorized charges. If there is a discrepancy, call your bank and report it.
  • Use familiar websites. Buy from well-known, trusted retailers. Go directly to the website of your choice, and do not click any links you get from emails or SMS, even if you are familiar with the website. Some attackers may create a fake website that looks very similar to the real website, so be careful not to fall into this kind of trap.
  • Know the vendor. Make sure the website or vendor is legitimate. One way to do this is to read reviews or testimonials by other users. For example, eBay allows customers to rate their vendors, so make sure to buy from a seller with high ratings.
  • Make sure the site is secure. Before you enter any personal details or payment information, look for signs that the site is secure. Make sure the payment page address begins with “https” and there is a locked padlock symbol on the browser. The ‘s’ stands for secure, and ensures the transaction is encrypted.
  • Never use unsecured wireless networks to make an online This includes Wi-Fi hotspots in public places such as cafes and hotels.
  • Use safe payment options such as PayPal or credit cards. Never send your bank or credit card details via email, as it’s not a secure method of transmitting financial information. Check your credit card statement frequently to make sure there aren’t any unauthorized charges. When making a payment to an individual seller, never transfer the money directly into their bank account. Instead, use a secure payment site such as PayPal.

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

IG_OnlineShopping

Online shopping is a popular trend of buying products or services through the internet. The wide range of choices available online make it very attractive and convenient to shop from the comfort of your home.

Are there any risks that people should be aware of?

There are quite a lot of risks when shopping online, but I’d like to highlight the top 3 risks that everyone should be aware of.

  • Online scam is a way for people to cheat other people without having to obtain users’ personal info Instead, victims willingly give their personal information to scammers.
  • Phishing is another way of getting sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card
  • Identity theft is the act of impersonating someone else by using their personal information

How can you use online shopping safely?

Before you start online shopping:

  • Protect your personal information. When making a purchase online, be alert to the kind of information being collected to complete the transaction. Make sure you think it is necessary for the vendor to request that information. Remember, you only need to fill out required fields on a checkout form. Before providing your personal or financial information, check the website’s privacy policy. Make sure you understand how your information will be stored and used.
  • Keep a paper trail. Print and save records of your online transactions, including the product description, price, online receipt, terms of the sale, and copies of any email exchange with the seller. Check your credit card statements as soon as you get them, to make sure there aren’t any unauthorized charges. If there is a discrepancy, call your bank and report it.
  • Use familiar websites. Buy from well-known, trusted retailers. Go directly to the website of your choice, and do not click any links you get from emails or SMS, even if you are familiar with the website. Some attackers may create a fake website that looks very similar to the real website, so be careful not to fall into this kind of trap.
  • Know the vendor. Make sure the website or vendor is legitimate. One way to do this is to read reviews or testimonials by other users. For example, eBay allows customers to rate their vendors, so make sure to buy from a seller with high ratings.
  • Make sure the site is secure. Before you enter any personal details or payment information, look for signs that the site is secure. Make sure the payment page address begins with “https” and there is a locked padlock symbol on the browser. The ‘s’ stands for secure, and ensures the transaction is encrypted.
  • Never use unsecured wireless networks to make an online This includes Wi-Fi hotspots in public places such as cafes and hotels.
  • Use safe payment options such as PayPal or credit cards. Never send your bank or credit card details via email, as it’s not a secure method of transmitting financial information. Check your credit card statement frequently to make sure there aren’t any unauthorized charges. When making a payment to an individual seller, never transfer the money directly into their bank account. Instead, use a secure payment site such as PayPal.

This article is part of a series for a campaign run by Brunei Computer Emergency Response Team (BruCERT) which is a team under ITPSS. For more info, do check out their website.

Read the full article →

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